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Death by Selfie

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Written By Laurie Essig Ph.D.
From Psychology Today

LaurieEssigPeople are dying tryng to take a selfie. This weekend a 21-year-old man died in Bali when he fell off a cliff while trying to take a photo of himself. In Moscow, a 21-year-old woman died when she tried to take a selfie while holding a gun to her head. The gun went off. Alas, these stories are not unusal. A quick search for “death by selfie” reveals similarly sad stories. A 17-year-old Russian girl was electrocuted while taking a selfie on a bridge. A 21-year-old man in Spain climbed on top of a train to take a selfie and was electrocuted. In Portugal, a Polish family was vacationing when mom and dad fell off a cliff and died while trying to take a selfie.

In some ways, death by selfie is both patterned and predictable. Like suicide, death by selfies is not randomly distributed throughout the population. Since sociologist Emile Durkheim wrote his classic study of suicide in 1897, we have known that men are more likely to kill themselves than women. We now know that older white men from more rural states are the most at risk. Death by selfie is also not randomly distributed. It probably occurs more often for those for whom social media is an important factor for their sense of self. Selficide thus probably is most likely to affect younger people and is highly likely when those people imagine an opportunity to enact the self in an unusal way—like on vacation or in a physical location, like a bridge or the top of a train, that is not an everyday experience.  

In order to understand the premium that some people are willing to place on a selfie, it is important to turn to another sociologist, Erving Goffman. In The Performance of Self in Everyday Life, Goffman wrote that we become ourselves by performing ourselves. Fifty years before the age of selfies, Goffman understood that there is no core self, but only a self in relationship to others and that in order to be “ourselves” we are constantly called upon to act ourselves. The problem, of course, is that we might begin to believe our front stage presentations of ourselves as “real” or, perhaps worse, become alienated and cynical from our own performances of self. On social media, we see both these things happening. We stage ourselves with selfies, and we simultaneously acknowledge this staging.

Here’s a selfie of me on a cliff before a beautiful sea. But it’s a selfie. Get it? I’m staging myself before this beautiful sea. Or as Goffman put it: 

“(T)o the degree that the individual maintains a show before others that he himself does not believe, he can come to experience a special kind of alienation from self and a special kind of wariness of others.”

As Goffman’s 1959 classic shows, humans understood the importance of the presentation of self long before social media and selfies existed. All of social life is about presenting our vision of ourselves and trying to get our audience to believe it. 

But what is more of a dramatic fail than dying by selfie? At just the moment when we are supposed to be documenting our lives as extraordinary—as better than yours because I found this gun or climbed this bridge—our life ends. 

And so a new genre of selfie—the selficide—is born. It is part tragedy and all irony.

 

Image Source: LaurieEssig, Febfast

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Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only.

The author, Drew Canole, and the associated www.fitlife.tv are not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury. It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition or exercise program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician.

Drew Canole and Fitlife.tv claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.

Internet Addiction

How Your Phone Is Messing With The Quality Of Your Sleep

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Written By Emi Boscamp 
From Mind Body Green

Whether you’re texting sweet nothings to your significant other or compulsively refreshing your Instagram feed before bed, chances are you usually fall asleep with your glowing phone right next to your face.

You probably already heard that it’s not good for you — but you had no idea why. Well, now we know why: It disrupts our circadian rhythms, the light-triggered releases of hormones that enable restful sleep.

New findings published in the British journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B show us that the fact that we aren’t adequately exposed to natural light during the day and then overexposed to artificial light at night can actually mess up our circadian rhythm.

And circadian disruption has in turn been linked to a host of health problems, such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, and depression.

“It’s become clear that typical lighting is affecting our physiology,” said lead author Richard Stevens, in a news release. “But lighting can be improved. We’re learning that better lighting can reduce these physiological effects. By that we mean dimmer and longer wavelengths in the evening, and avoiding the bright blue of e-readers, tablets and smart phones.”

Their analysis found that the devices we’ve grown so accustomed to emit enough blue light to actually disrupt our body’s natural clock when used in the evening.

“We don’t know for certain, but there’s growing evidence that the long-term implications of this have ties to breast cancer, obesity, diabetes, and depression, and possibly other cancers,” said Stevens, though, as always, it’s important to remember that correlation doesn’t necessarily mean causation.

But according to Stevens, most people live in a sort of “circadian fog.” So while the extent to which health risk can be attributed to artificial light is still unclear, it’s probably a good idea to break out of that fog while more research is being done.

If you have a choice between an e-reader and a book, at night, choose the book. And maybe get in the habit of texting goodnight to your boo well before you get into bed.

 

 Image Source:  Huffington Post

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Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only.

The author, Drew Canole, and the associated www.fitlife.tv are not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury. It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition or exercise program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician.

Drew Canole and Fitlife.tv claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.

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Signs You Are A Facebook Junkie (and You Don’t Even Know About It)

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Article source: PositiveMed

Signs You Are A Facebook Junkie:

The increased use of social networking, especially among young people, is a clear example of how easily we become addicted to new technology.

These statements are categorical, researchers say one of the negatives to overusing social networks is social isolation. This occurs when a person stimulates their virtual relationships instead of developing their personality in a real, physical environment. This situation is reflected by the extreme anxiety of some regarding their likes, posts, and status, being highly sensitive and overly conscious about what’s going on in the virtual world, with Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr contents their top priorities. They prefer to interact with virtual friends more than real people.

facebook-junkie

Another symptom of social media addiction with negative effects is that a person will experience acceptance on these networks, because they are designed to emphasize the positives in life, the bright side that is socially accepted that we feel comfortable showing. This can result in denial of our defects and the defects of others, creating relationships based on sensation-seeking or immediate satisfaction.

Those hooked on social networking continually update their profiles and pictures and are very conscious of comments and likes, and are more narcissistic and insecure than average, according to a recent study.
Researchers at the University of York, Canada, reveals how networking is the perfect retreat for people who meet these criteria, as it allows them to establish a large number of ‘hollow’ friends without having to maintain a real relationship with them. The findings show there is a positive relationship between levels of narcissism or low self-esteem detected by the test, and the number of times per day that students update on social networks, according to experts this is not a surprising fact, narcissism can be rooted in lack of self-esteem.

Finally, the research, which involved equal numbers of men and women, also showed how men are more likely to review the comments on your profile, while women perused uploaded pictures.

signs-you-are-a-facebook-junkie-2

Symptoms of A Social Media Addict (Facebook junkie):

1- You are online all the time. No matter where you are or what you’re doing, you contribute live postings and comments about your day, your posts, and other posts. You don’t pay attention to the people that are with you, family or friends.

2- Walking or driving while looking at a mobile phone. Often the social media addict won’t realize he is crossing streets, driving, or acting strangely because of their addiction. Studies prove texting while driving can be fatal, dangerous for yourself and others,, maybe more than driving while intoxicated.

3- Posting everything that happens to you. See if this is familiar: the first time a friend eats sushi, he takes a selfie with the sushi, just to inform us. Sometimes people cut themselves, they’ll post a picture before bandaging. They assume others are interested in every detail of their lives.

4- Sleeping less. Do you procrastinate bedtime to be online?

Sources:
The Myth Of Freedom From Facebook HuffingtonPost.com | Bianca Bosker
Five clues that you are addicted to Facebook. By  Elizabeth Cohen CNN Senior Medical Correspondent

Article source: PositiveMed
Image source:
The Globe and Mail

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Disclaimer: The techniques, strategies, and suggestions expressed here are intended to be used for educational purposes only.

The author, Drew Canole, and the associated www.fitlife.tv are not rendering medical advice, nor to diagnose, prescribe, or treat any disease, condition, illness, or injury. It is imperative that before beginning any nutrition or exercise program you receive full medical clearance from a licensed physician.

Drew Canole and Fitlife.tv claim no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the material presented here.